View Tips for Current Time of Year - early April

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SpeciesTaxon stageFoodplantTime of yearTipRankPhoto
View field tip details Red Sword-grass
Sword-grass
Imago April to MayThe adults come to sugar in April and May; May 14th for Red Sword-grass and Sword-grass on May 27th, are my latest records (Kane) [Tutt]Tip has photos
View field tip details Acleris caledoniana
Apotomis sauciana
Ancylis geminana
LarvaBilberry, Vaccinium myrtillus
late March to AprilThe larvae feed in spring in the tops of the foodplant, the plants being sometimes quite blighted by the larvae. [Tutt]
View field tip details Acleris hyemana
Imagooaks, Quercus spp.
March to AprilThe adults are sometimes to be obtained in numbers by searching the trunks of oak-trees after dark (Thurnall). [Tutt]Tip has photos
View field tip details Acleris logiana
Imagobirches, Betula spp.
mid February to early AprilAdults are to be found on birch trunks in spring; by sleeving the female on birch trees long series may be bred. [Tutt]Tip has photos
View field tip details Acrolepia autumnitella
Imagospruces, Picea spp.
early AprilThe sunny side of spruce hedges should be beaten during the first week of April. The adult can only be disturbed from about 12.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.; during this period the male flies out if disturbed, but the female drops to the ground. [Tutt]
View field tip details Aethes rutilana
LarvaJuniper, Juniperus communis
April to MayThe larva feeds in a slight web on the shoots of juniper. [Tutt]
View field tip details Agapeta zoegana
LarvaCommon Knapweed, Centaurea nigra
AprilRoots collected in April will produce adults in July. [Tutt]
View field tip details Agdistis bennetii
LarvaCommon Sea-lavender, Limonium vulgare
April to May, JulyThe larvae feed on the leaves. The large pieces taken out of the leaves are a good guide as to the whereabouts of the larvae. [Tutt]Tip has photos
View field tip details Agonopterix nanatella
LarvaCarline Thistle, Carlina vulgaris
April to MayThe larva draws the two edges of a carline thistle leaf together and feeds in the roll thus made. The white shiny surface of the leaf being exposed makes it conspicuous [Tutt]
View field tip details Alucita hexadactyla
OvaHoneysuckle, Lonicera periclymenum
AprilThe eggs are laid on the flower-buds, when the corolla is about a quarter of an inch in length; the eggs are deposited in almost any part of the corolla or on the margin of the calyx, and are at first white, then yellow and lastly orange in colour; they are readily seen and easy to find on the growing heads of flower-buds of the honeysuckle, often more than one to be found on a head. [Tutt]
View field tip details Amphisbatis incongruella
Imago AprilThe adults are to be found flying in the sun over heather on Carrington Moss; none were observed unless birch trees were near (Edleston). [Tutt]
View field tip details Anerastia lotella
Larvasedges, Carex spp.
grasses, Gramineae
late March to AprilSearch the sand about the roots of various grasses and sedges on the sandhills near the seaside for the silken tubes in which the larvae reside. [Tutt]
View field tip details Aproaerema anthyllidella
LarvaKidney Vetch, Anthyllis vulneraria
AprilThe shoots should be examined; ther bleached appearance betokens the presence of this species. [Tutt]
View field tip details Argyresthia glaucinella
LarvaHorse-chestnut, Aesculus hippocastanum
oaks, Quercus spp.
AprilThe larvae are to be found feeding solitarily on the sound bark of oak and horse-chestnut trres, revealing their retreats by protruding a little reddish frass from the hole (Edleston). [Tutt]
View field tip details Argyresthia goedartella
Larvabirches, Betula spp.
AprilThe trunks of birches are often covered with silk threads, and on such the larvae are to be found in great numbers burrowing into the crannies of the birches, many huddled together into very small depressions. The silk suggests that the larvae feed at the top of the tree, and only come down for pupation. [Tutt]
View field tip details Aspilapteryx tringipennella
LarvaRibwort Plantain, Plantago lanceolata
late March to JuneLarvae betray their presence by causing the leaves to contract through being mined down the centre, with large bladdery mines. The larvae do not quit their mines to pupate. [Tutt]ranking 3Tip has photos
View field tip details Batia unitella
Larvaelms, Ulmus spp.
February to AprilUnder the loose bark of elm-posts and the rails by the side of fields, etc., the dirty blackish larvae may be found living under a slight web, mixed with frass and gnawed wood (Elisha). [Tutt]
View field tip details Biselachista cinereopunctella
LarvaGlaucous Sedge, Carex glauca
AprilBy looking at the bases of the leaves that have been mined by the larvae, the pupae may be readily collected, their position being in the angle of the leaf, which it has mined as a larva. it frequents those plants that grow in the shelter of bushes. [Tutt]
View field tip details Bryotropha affinis
Bryotropha domestica
LarvaMoss
AprilThose who are not averse to early rising may now spend very profitable hours by searching the moss on old walls before the dew has evaporated. By doing so, the probabilities are that their energy will be rewarded by a good supply of larvae. These larvae are easily reared if kept in seed-pans on moist patches of their foodplant. [Tutt]
View field tip details Bucculatrix cristatella
LarvaYarrow, Achillea millefolium
April to May, JulyThe larvae are to be found on the leaves. Care must be taken not to shake the plants or the larvae will fall to the ground, and then are not easily to be detected. Later on the most beautiful white cocoons may be found spin on the leaves and stem of the foodplant [Tutt]
View field tip details Bucculatrix cristatella
LarvaYarrow, Achillea millefolium
March to AprilThe larvae nibble the leaves causing the bitten edges to turn brown, which betrays their presence. The beautiful ribbed whitish cocoon is spun irregularly across the front of the leaf and may be found in May. [Tutt]ranking 5Tip has photos
View field tip details Bucculatrix nigricomella
LarvaOxeye Daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare
AprilThe larvae are to be found mining the leaves in long galleries which they will soon quit to feed on the leaves externally. Dig up the plants and pot them; the larvae will soon spin their beautiful reticulated cocoons (Elisha). [Tutt]
View field tip details Bucculatrix nigricomella
Larva AprilIf leaves of the foodplant have small holes through them, most likely larvae will still be found on their underside, but, should larvae be absent, the beautiful white shuttle-like cocoons spun by them may be discovered attached to the plants and grass culms near at hand. The larvae hang by a thread if the leaves are in the least shaken. [Tutt]
View field tip details Caryocolum fraternella
LarvaField Mouse-ear, Cerastium arvense
Common Mouse-ear, Cerastium fontanum
Bog-stitchwort, Stellaria alsine
Lesser Stitchwort, Stellaria graminea
AprilThe larvae is to be found drawing together the shoots of the foodplant; affects a chalky habitat. [Tutt]
View field tip details Caryocolum fraternella
LarvaField Mouse-ear, Cerastium arvense
Common Mouse-ear, Cerastium fontanum
Bog-stitchwort, Stellaria alsine
Lesser Stitchwort, Stellaria graminea
early April to mid AprilLarvae occur during the early part of April in the drawn-together leading shoots. Railway-banks and commons are the most likely places for them to occur. After having found one tenanted screwed-up shoot, it is best not to open others, as by so doing the larvae will not have the chance to wriggle out and escape. [Tutt]
View field tip details Caryocolum marmoreum
LarvaCommon Mouse-ear, Cerastium fontanum
April to MayWhen lying on the sand searching for the sand-tubes of the larvae attached to the low trailing stems and leaves, the ground on which one has been lying should be examined, for it is often swarming with larvae which have been disturbed and driven from their tubes.
View field tip details Caryocolum tricolorella
LarvaGreater Stitchwort, Stellaria holostea
February to AprilLarvae should be sought in spun-together tops of the foodplant. [Tutt]
View field tip details Caryocolum viscariella
Larvacatchflies, Lychnis spp.
April to MayThe larva are to be found in the tops of the foodplant. [Tutt]
View field tip details Clavigesta sylvestrana
LarvaMaritime Pine, Pinus pinaster
Stone Pine, Pinus pinea
March to AprilThe larva feeds in the shoots. It may be detected by the pellet of frass which is ejected from the tunnel by the larva, and which remains attached outside. [Tutt]
View field tip details Cnaemidophorus rhododactyla
Larvaroses, Rosa spp.
April to JuneThe larvae are to be found beneath the leaf overlapping the rosebud, eating into the unexpanded bud from the side; others, however, are to be found in similar positions at the tips of the young shoots. When fullgrown, those that have been feeding on the buds affix themselves to the side of the leaf close by the bud and draw the leaf and the bud together by means of a few silken threads; the others draw together, in a similar way, several leaves at the end of the young shoots. [Tutt]

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